medievalpoc:

Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner

Speaking of movies, this is basically Inuit Beowulf.

It was written, produced, directed, and acted entirely by Inuit people. I think a lot of people might be interested in Medieval Inuit art and literature, and this is a pretty great example.

You can watch and download the entire trilogy here for free (but donate if you can!!!); Atanarjuat is the first film and takes place around 1000 A.D.-ish. It also won a LOT of awards. Keep in mind: it’s entirely in Inuktitut, with English subtitles.

isapo-muxika-images:

Don’t hate, educate yourself #sealfie

isapo-muxika-images:

Don’t hate, educate yourself #sealfie

theskortinglife:

In an intelligent and heartfelt video, teenager Killaq Enuaraq Strauss tells Ellen DeGeneres why the seal hunt is important to Canada’s Inuit people. 

 

radicalmenofcolor:

Inuit Flood Twitter With ‘Sealfies’ After Ellen DeGeneres Selfie Funds Hunt Haters

3/31/14

A month after Ellen DeGeneres tweeted her record-breaking celebrity-laden selfie during the Oscars on March 2—now surpassing 3.4 million retweets—Samsung’s copy.5-million donation to an anti-seal hunting organization has sparked a new viral meme.

What started with a teenager’s video explaining Inuit lifeways to the star has morphed into a twitter hashtag answering “selfie” with “sealfie,” as social media–savvy Inuit—who have for millennia depended on seals for meat, clothing and trade—fire back with their own hashtag featuring photos of them garbed in seal fur coats, mittens, boots and shawls. DeGeneres, fans and Twitter followers were elated when Samsung pledged to donate copy for every retweet of DeGeneres’s Oscars selfie to a charity of her choice. The trouble started when the star, who hosted the Academy Awards, designated copy.5 million for the Humane Society of the United States, an organization that campaigns strongly against the seal hunt in Canada. 

The online trend was sparked after Iqaluit teenager Killaq Enuaraq-Strauss, 17, uploaded a March 23 video to YouTube imploring DeGeneres to reconsider her choice of the Humane Society of the U.S. as a designated charity for Samsung’s post-Oscar donation.

“We do not hunt seals, or any animal for that matter, for fashion,” Enuaraq-Strauss said in the video. “We hunt to survive. If Canada were to ban the seal hunt, so many families would suffer, would face harsher forms of malnutrition, and wouldn’t be able to afford proper clothing for the Arctic environment we live in. Even more so, another part of our culture would have been killed.”

The Iqaluit youth took particular umbrage not only with the AHS’s campaigns for Canada to ban the controversial seal hunt—long a target of animal rights protesters—but their successful push for the European Union to ban seal imports (although the EU made some exemptions for traditional Inuit products).

The hashtag was started by journalist Leila Beaudoin, who encouraged others to jump into the furry fray: “Show your fur, people!”

Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2014/03/31/inuit-flood-twitter-sealfies-after-ellen-degeneres-selfie-funds-hunt-haters-154250

policymic:

Indigenous Canadians stand up to Ellen DeGeneres using #sealfies, fight for their right hunt seals

"We do not hunt seals, or any animal for that matter, for fashion," Killaq Enuaraq-Strauss, 17, says. "We hunt to survive. If Canada were to ban the seal hunt, so many families would suffer, would face harsher forms of malnutrition, and wouldn’t be able to afford proper clothing for the Arctic environment we live in. Even more so, another part of our culture would have been killed."

Read moreFollow policymic

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"I am an Inuit seal meat eater, and my fur is ethical," wrote Alethea Arnaquq-Baril, bundled in a sealskin coat, pants and boots. She also wrote a letter to DeGeneres and posted it online.

Samsung vowed to donate $1 for every retweet of DeGeneres’ celebrity-packed Oscars selfie to a charity of her choice. She raised $1.5 million for the Humane Society of the United States, which campaigns annually against Canada’s seal hunt.

The Ellen DeGeneres Show’s website calls the seal hunt “one of the most atrocious and inhumane acts against animals allowed by any government.”

The Inuit have long defended the hunt as a sustainable practice, deeply rooted in Inuit culture, which helps feed people in a region plagued by hunger.

"The meat feeds families, which is important to an area where many households have identified that they face issues of food insecurity," said Sandi Vincent, who posted her own sealfie Thursday.

The pelts also come in handy in the cold northern climate and provide a needed source of income, she said. She also countered the idea of the hunt as “inhumane.”

"In Inuit culture, it is believed seals and other animals have souls and offer themselves to you. Humanely and with gratitude we accepted this gift," she said, reminiscing about catching her first seal at age 15.

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